Monday, March 9, 2009

09 Week #9 - Screennation






Another collective website for teenage moviemakers looks to be another positive resource for you budding filmmakers. It is called ScreenNation and I want you to check it out and share some things that you discover for this week's blog post. Visit http://screennation.afi.com/. Browse through the site. Click on the Challenges link. Any ideas for an entry from you? After this week's project you will be choosing a new movie project topic each week. This site may give you some ideas. You could also post your previous productions to this site and get feedback from all over the globe. Finally, you should click on the "LEARN" link on the left side of the homepage and watch at least 3 of the teaching videos. Tell us what you learned in this week's blog post.

10 comments:

Molly said...

The three videos I watched on screennation.afi.com were:Pre-production, Your Final Edit, and AFI: Lighting Tips.
The pre-production video talked about planning and making sure you are safe when you get the shot. It also talked about how important planning is. The Your Final Edit video I watched was about when you are finishing you video yon need to find the right places for transition, how to appeal to the audience, and making sure the music , transitions, and effects help to tell the story. It talked about making your film the best it can be. The third video, Lighting Tips, talked about the easy ways and steps to correctly light a scene.It included backlight, keylight, and fill-light. It talked about using things from the sun to flashlights for light in your scene.

Kelsey Mundhenke! said...

The Challenges link gave ideas about making a movie review and telling a ghost story, making a move review could be fun. The first video I watched was Pre-writing because thats an area that is really important, and also an area that I struggle with. The tips they gave were to create goals and brainstorm how you want your movie to play out. They talked about planning each shot and making sure it is possible and safe. The next video I watched was Interview Basics, because we have done interviewing projects in the past, but didn't really know how to get a professional shot. They talked about getting different shots. There are wide shots, which establish the scene to the viewer. Then there are close ups. These are used on the interviewer and the person being interviewed. They use a lavaliere mic to get the best sound quality! Then I watched the Lighting video, because this is also an area I have issues with. It is bad to have a powerful light source behind the person, because it makes them look really dark. They said to have the light shine on there face so you would be able to get a good shot.

McKenzie Connot said...

The three movies that I watched on sreen nation (http://screennation.afi.com/)were, AFI Learn- Transitions, Video Tips: Lighting and finally, AFI Learn: Sound Tips. AFI: Transitions were about how to make your movie flow. Transitions of a movie are really important because rough transitions really can ruin a good movie or take away from the effect of one. For good transitions they use THE CUT. This makes the transitions smooth and impacting. Secondly, Video Tips on lighting talked about a good light source and bad light source. What you do not want to do is put your main person, or thing in front of a bright background, because then all you see is there shadow. IT said the two most important charateristics of a good video is lighting and sound. Finally, I watched AFI: Sound Tips. It talked about how sound is essential to a good movie. An external microphone can help boost your sound and make your sound clear. If you don't have this type of high quality equipment,you just need to make sure where your shooting your clip, the background noise is consistent. The one's who is filming should wear head phones to hear what it's going to sound like, so you know if your sound needs to be adjusted right away, before you waste a lot of timw filming, and not getting any good footage.

Heather's blog said...

Thr three videos I watched were Pre-writing, Sound-tips, and lighting. In the pre-writing it talked about planning with your group first then discuss. After studing the history of your peice you may have to talk to your group and change your ideas. Also make sure any pictures, music you use is allowed and not copyrighted.In sound-tips they talked about using a directional mic. Also if they only mic is the one build into your camera take the footage in a quiet place for less back ground noise.In lighting they were discussing to stay away from bright back light like standing in front of a window. Your subject becomes a shadow in the middle.

Hayley Herzog said...

First I watched the video called Pre-Writing. I watched this because I think it is an essential step in making a movie or any kind of production. This is an area that I could definitely use some work! I thought it was smart of them to talk about setting goals in your pre-writing so that you know what you want to achieve through your piece. The next video that I watched was lighting tips. I watched this one because you can definitely tell the difference of a good movie and a bad movie through their lighting. One thing that I hadn't expected in this video was that it even talked about using flashlights for your scene. I had never thought about that, but it does make sense. The final video that I watched was Interview Basics. I felt like I knew most of the advice that was given in this one because it just talked about getting different shots so that your interview wasn't boring.

McKenna Moyes said...

i looked at the learning video and it explained that everything that you put on your movie, whether its pictures, videos, or instructions, are all purposely put there to be learned by the audience. I also watched AFI’s: Lights, Camera, Education! This taught me about script development. There are 3 steps: prewriting phase where you write out ideas and brainstorm about what you want to tell and how you want to tell it, write a brief outline where you rewrite your story, then pitch the ideas to your class to get feedback on your ideas. I also watched Storyboarding ( Lights, Camera, Education!) and it taught me how important it is to create a storyboard of what your going to do because it gives everyone helping to create the project an idea of what your going to do and what angles you want to use for certain shots.

Avery said...

The first video that I watched was called "Outline & Treatment." This video explained how the outline is the basic story line of the story. It also told you how to "find the juice" which gets the audience to become attached to your video. The video also explained some questions you could ask yourself about the scene so that it can better help you to figure out what is going on in your film-making.

The next video I watched was "Transitions" This video explained different types of transitions. The first transition it told about was The Cut: the point where two shots come together. Another transition was The Dissolve: the blending of two shots to communicate a passage of time/location to audience.

The last video that I watched was called "Sound Tips". This talked about the different types of microphones and different ways to use them. It also told about the noises that may be in the background if you are just using your cameras microphone.

bergenhesse said...

The first video that I watched was the one about pre-writing. This one is probably the most important one for me to watch because it is the part that I struggle with the most. It explained the importance of getting everything together, and being creative and brainstorming, but also not to get to big of ideas for your project and make sure that they are possible and safe. I also watch the video on lighting, tips on lighting are very important because sometimes bad lighting can ruin your shot, while good lighting can make it even better. I also watched a video on sound, it talked about equipment that can help improve your film, it also gave tips for those who don't have that equipment. These videos gave a lot of tips, and they will be very useful for this last quarter and our new assignments that we have every week, I'll probably end up coming back to see more videos on screenation.afi.com

Jenna said...

The first video I watched was on Pre- writing. This video talked about planning before you film so that you make sure you get the shot you want when you film it, just to be safe :)This is something that I've notice I struggle with. This movie also taught us to brain storm and be creative before you start filming, which is very important. The second movie I watched was Lighting Tips. This video simply talked about the easy ways to light a scene to make it look more appealing. This tips included Keylight, backlight, and fill-light. This video also showed how you can use the sun and a flash light to make you scene more appealing. I think that this is important because you don't want people or objects in your movies to appear unattractive or have shadows casted on their faces. The third and final movie I watched was how to "Final Edit." This was helpful because it showed how to pull all your clips together and make a good movie in the end. Final editing is important when making a movie because by adding little details and finishing touches to a film, you can make it a much better result. This video specifically talked about how and where to add transitions. It also said to make sure that your music, transition, and effects added appeal to the audience and help tell the story you are trying to create.

Anonymous said...

The three videos i watched on screennation.afi.com were: Pre-production,pre-writing, and Afi learn sound tips. The pre-production video talked about saftey when getting the shot and the planning needed before you go to film. It also talked about how important planning is. The pre-writing video was similar to the pre-production because they talked about planning out your shots and writing how you want the movie to play out and how the different scenes will play out. The sound tips video talked about how sound was very important to the video.An external microphone can be very useful but if you dont have access to that kinda of equipment you just need to make sure the back ground noise is consistant. It would also help if the person who is filming would wear head phones so they can see if the sound needs to be adjusted at the time so you dont waste a lot of footage and time.

-Rainey