Tuesday, March 18, 2008

FlickSchool

We have viewed segments from FlickSchool before, but for this week's blog, I would like you to find some additional tips and advice from this great website. Visit http://web.mac.com/cinedelagente/, click on a few episodes of FlickSchool, and share what you learned.

8 comments:

Katie said...

I watched a couple of different videos. One was about giving your movie a "film look" or making it look professional. One thing that I learned from this video was that you're actually able to layer video just like you can layer pictures in photoshop to see the parts that you like about each piece. The other video I watched talked about screenplay. I guess what a learned from this one is that a script writer really has to break down what he/she writes into more pieces than you would think.

MichaelH said...

The movies on Flickschool showed us how many different dollys and ways of using camera shots and it's really interesting what all you can use such as a skateboard or a cart of some kind. Also they showed you in detail some of the camera shots and what they actually represent or show and how it affects the movie.

Tiff said...

I watched a video on microphones. I learned that there are three major types. The handheld, lavalier, and boom microphones. The handheld is used when you are interviewing someone and you want both people and the microphone showing. The lavalier is used when you just want one person showing but the sound to be heard. The lavalier is clipped on to the person's shirt. The boom microphone is held above the speakers so it is not showing in the movie, but still helps with the audio.

KellyS said...

i watched the rule of thirds video. One way to make a picture more interesting is to move your subject in the frame instead of just being in the center. Power points are the point where the lines intersect in the rule of thirds when you split the frame up with imagining there is 2 horizontal lines and 2 vertical lines. You could place the subject on the same power points but you can position the subject vertically diagonally and it will give the shot a totally different shot. so don't always feel like the your subject has to be centered

Kylie said...

Flick School shows you the basics of camera footage and how to shoot even how to use a camera to a certain extent but it also goes into depth upon the critiques and establishes complex shots that ever videographer needs to know!I watched the rule of thirds video and it shows that to get a better and more creative outlook will be to have the center subject placed at either side of the frame instead of right in the middle!

Brittany said...

I watched a film about the shot list for a movie. A shot list will give you more detail than a story board will. Also with a shot list you may film the beginning and the end of a movie at the same time even though the movie will be out of order it is time sufficient to get the scenes done if you are using the same background or scenery. Also, scenes with sound effects are distinguished because you could make a day when you shoot all the scenes without sound effects so those people wouldn't have to come in. Shot lists are very effective ways of planning your film!

Connor said...

I watched the video on alternative dollies. It taught that if you do not have access to a dolly a skateboard works well, as does a wheelchair or even sitting on a cart that is similar to the one in the back of the classroom that the SMH kids are always using because we never charge our batteries! I found it a good tip!

Ciera said...

I was not able to get the videos to work, but they had great tips on basic items you can use as make shift dollies, tripods, audio, and others that will boost your video making abilities! Any student can look these simple suggestions over and instantly improve their movie making skills.